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Friday, 4 January 2019

Microsoft Teams: Changing Time/Date Settings

When using the installed Microsoft Teams client it is possible to change the time/date settings to display formatting other than US English.

To do so, click your user icon in the top right corner of the screen and go to "Settings". Change the App language to your preferred setting and click "Save and Restart". Once Teams loads again the date/time formats with be set correctly

Microsoft Azure: Get-AzSubscription Returns Token Error

Recently I changed my Azure login to use my organisational account rather than a Microsoft account for a particular subscription. Following this I found I was unable to access the subscription via PowerShell.

Running the cmdlet "Get-AzSubscription" (or "Get-AzureRmSubscription" if you use the older command set) returned the information for most of my subscriptions but threw the following warning for the subscription where my login had been changed;
WARNING: Unable to acquire token for tenant 'x''
After some investigation I found that my old credentials were cached in the context. Running the following cmdlet cleared this cache and allowed the subscription to be access via PowerShell again;
Clear-AzContext
(or Clear-AzureRmContext with the older cmdlets)

You can disable this auto-caching of tokens by using the following;
Disable-AzContextAutosave
(or Disable-AzureRmContextAutosave with the older cmdlets)

Friday, 24 August 2018

vSphere: Find VM by MAC Address

While trawling through event logs on a Windows server I encountered the following error;


The system detected an address conflict for IP address x.x.x.x with the system having network hardware address 00-50-56-xx-xx-xx. Network operations on this system may be disrupted as a result

Knowing that 00-50-56 is a VMware MAC Address I used PowerShell to search for the network adaptor with that MAC assigned;


Get-VM | Get-NetworkAdapter | Where {$_.MacAddress -eq “00:50:56:xx:xx:xx”} | fl

 The "Parent" in the resulting output is the VM name

Wednesday, 28 February 2018

AWS: IAM Users And Groups Report

The following script will pull the list of groups associated with IAM users in AWS. The user list can be generated by going to the IAM service in the AWS console and selecting "Credential Report".

$users = get-content iam-users.txt
$report = @() 
foreach ($user in $users)
{
    $info = Get-IAMGroupForUser -UserName $user | select -ExpandProperty GroupName
$report+="$user, $info"
}
$report | Out-File "user-groups.csv"

Friday, 7 July 2017

PowerShell: Get Hostname Following Successful Ping

The script below will attempt to ping a range of IP addresses and if successful, will return their hostnames;
1..10 | % {Test-NetConnection -ComputerName x.x.x.$_ -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue -WarningAction SilentlyContinue } | Select ComputerName,RemoteAddress,PingSucceeded, `@{ Name = 'HostName'; Expression = { If ($_.PingSucceeded){([System.Net.Dns]::gethostentry($_.computername)).HostName}Else{$null} } } | FT -AutoSize
Replace the "1..10" at the start of the command with the range of IP addresses you wish to scan and update the -ComputerName parameter with the IP you wish to scan (e.g. 10.100.1.$_)

PowerShell: Basic Networking Troubleshooting

http://www.thomasmaurer.ch/2016/02/basic-networking-powershell-cmdlets-cheatsheet-to-replace-netsh-ipconfig-nslookup-and-more/

The above site has a nice "cheat sheet" of PowerShell cmdlets for networking tasks